"Problems cannot be solved at the same level of awareness that created them. " -Albert Einstein

(Female, 21. This is merely a collection of 'design and motivation for myself and others to 'design' a cleaner, higher-intelligent, and innovative future)

Personal Blog: http://www.aquariuslove07.tumblr.com

artisansknight:

The snow that has blanketed much of the Middle East turned Cairo white on Friday, 13th 2013 – with local news reports claiming it was Egypt’s capital’s first snowfall in 112 years.

artisansknight:

The snow that has blanketed much of the Middle East turned Cairo white on Friday, 13th 2013 – with local news reports claiming it was Egypt’s capital’s first snowfall in 112 years.

— 3 months ago with 12 notes
solarreviews:

Find out which solar installers serve your area: www.solarreviews.com. The price to install solar energy on your home or businesses is probably less than you think, after accounting for state and federal incentives. 

solarreviews:

Find out which solar installers serve your area: www.solarreviews.com. The price to install solar energy on your home or businesses is probably less than you think, after accounting for state and federal incentives. 

— 3 months ago with 15 notes
rjccourt:

theatlantic:

Here’s the Insane Amount of Gas Americans Burn in Comparison to the Rest of the World

The typical American consumes more fuel, on average, than three Germans. 
Read more. [Image: Reuters]


Seriously - Germany is the size of Minnesota and the US is huge!  We have a bigger country.  Compare our gas usage to Russians or Canadians.  

rjccourt:

theatlantic:

Here’s the Insane Amount of Gas Americans Burn in Comparison to the Rest of the World

The typical American consumes more fuel, on average, than three Germans. 

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

Seriously - Germany is the size of Minnesota and the US is huge!  We have a bigger country.  Compare our gas usage to Russians or Canadians.  

— 3 months ago with 97 notes
designed-for-life:

Green steps at Concrete House by A-cero Architects

designed-for-life:

Green steps at Concrete House by A-cero Architects

— 3 months ago with 337 notes

The placebo effect goes beyond humans
Rats and humans have at least one thing in common: They both react the same way to a placebo, according to a new University of Florida study.
“That was the big finding — that the animals that expected pain relief actually got pain relief when you gave them an inert substance,” said co-author John Neubert, a pain specialist and an associate professor with the UF College of Dentistry department of orthodontics. “It helps validate our model that what we do in the rats, we believe, is a good representation of what’s being seen in humans.”
The investigation of placebo effects might lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets in the brain and of novel treatment strategies for a variety of health conditions.
A placebo response is a response seemingly to a treatment that has not actually been administered. For this study researchers looked at placebo responses in reference to pain and pain relief by evaluating how an animal responds when it “thinks” it’s getting a pain reliever.
UF researchers conditioned rats to expect morphine or salt water by giving injections of one or the other for two sessions. Then during the third session, researchers gave both groups the saline injection. About 30 to 40 percent of the group that had previously received morphine acted as if they had received morphine again and showed pain relief.
“What that means is we can then go ahead and do more mechanistic studies and do pharmacological studies targeting different receptors,” he said. “We could do different procedures and try to apply that knowledge into what we think is going on in humans.”
The two-year study published in the journal PAIN in October was the result of collaboration between Neubert and Niall Murphy, an addiction specialist and adjunct associate professor at the University of California Los Angeles. The two decided to look at placebo responses because that deals with pathways and mechanisms that relate to pain, reward and addiction.

The placebo effect goes beyond humans

Rats and humans have at least one thing in common: They both react the same way to a placebo, according to a new University of Florida study.

“That was the big finding — that the animals that expected pain relief actually got pain relief when you gave them an inert substance,” said co-author John Neubert, a pain specialist and an associate professor with the UF College of Dentistry department of orthodontics. “It helps validate our model that what we do in the rats, we believe, is a good representation of what’s being seen in humans.”

The investigation of placebo effects might lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets in the brain and of novel treatment strategies for a variety of health conditions.

A placebo response is a response seemingly to a treatment that has not actually been administered. For this study researchers looked at placebo responses in reference to pain and pain relief by evaluating how an animal responds when it “thinks” it’s getting a pain reliever.

UF researchers conditioned rats to expect morphine or salt water by giving injections of one or the other for two sessions. Then during the third session, researchers gave both groups the saline injection. About 30 to 40 percent of the group that had previously received morphine acted as if they had received morphine again and showed pain relief.

“What that means is we can then go ahead and do more mechanistic studies and do pharmacological studies targeting different receptors,” he said. “We could do different procedures and try to apply that knowledge into what we think is going on in humans.”

The two-year study published in the journal PAIN in October was the result of collaboration between Neubert and Niall Murphy, an addiction specialist and adjunct associate professor at the University of California Los Angeles. The two decided to look at placebo responses because that deals with pathways and mechanisms that relate to pain, reward and addiction.

(via neurosciencestuff)

— 3 months ago with 148 notes
utilitarianthings:

"Reading Braille is a time-consuming activity. Snail is an electronic Braille-to-voice converter that ‘reads’ and vocalizes Braille instantly.
When the user rolls Snail’s pressure-sensitive touch pad across lines of Braille, the device creates a corresponding voice output. The vocal translation can be recorded. The concept allows users to feel the freedom and independence of ‘reading’ Braille easily and quickly, and of ‘replaying’ the text at any subsequent time or place. A Bluetooth earphone can be used to listen to the translation in noise-sensitive environments such as libraries.
Guide wheels on both sides of the sensor help Snail to keep a steady direction and follow the lines of Braille. The device is self-powered; it generates its own power while it rolls. Playback of the recorded voice can be conveniently initiated by simply rolling the wheel a few times. A wiping pad is installed between the wheel and the handle section; gently pressing it down during rolling keeps Snail clean.”

utilitarianthings:

"Reading Braille is a time-consuming activity. Snail is an electronic Braille-to-voice converter that ‘reads’ and vocalizes Braille instantly.

When the user rolls Snail’s pressure-sensitive touch pad across lines of Braille, the device creates a corresponding voice output. The vocal translation can be recorded. The concept allows users to feel the freedom and independence of ‘reading’ Braille easily and quickly, and of ‘replaying’ the text at any subsequent time or place. A Bluetooth earphone can be used to listen to the translation in noise-sensitive environments such as libraries.

Guide wheels on both sides of the sensor help Snail to keep a steady direction and follow the lines of Braille. The device is self-powered; it generates its own power while it rolls. Playback of the recorded voice can be conveniently initiated by simply rolling the wheel a few times. A wiping pad is installed between the wheel and the handle section; gently pressing it down during rolling keeps Snail clean.”

— 3 months ago with 57 notes
nothingthebest:

GIYONGCHY | via Tumblr em @weheartit.com - http://whrt.it/Xc1ZAV

nothingthebest:

GIYONGCHY | via Tumblr em @weheartit.com - http://whrt.it/Xc1ZAV

— 3 months ago with 4 notes
saturnranch:

Olson Kundig - Ridge House

saturnranch:

Olson Kundig - Ridge House

— 3 months ago with 13 notes